Wednesday, March 6, 2019

My March Madness and IWSG Post


Call it March Madness, or just madness, but the moment March stepped into view, I set myself very high goals. My March goals are completing 2 chapter books, polishing a couple of picture books, reading my adult novel to revise it again and ofcourse reading a few books.

Now that we are done with my writing and reading goals, it’s time to focus on my IWSG post. Yes, its IWSG (Insecure Writers Support Group) time again. IWSG is an online, global group of writers. We post on the first Wednesday of the month. In our posts we tackle any of our writing insecurities, worries, fears, discuss our writing and publishing problems, learn from other writers who have overcome these doubts and anxieties and generally use this group to let off our writing steam.

IWSG was started by Ninja Captain Alex Cavanaugh. Adorable, Amazing Accomplished Alex is a guitarist, his blog is the place to visit for writers of all genres, and he is also a best-selling author: his books CassaStar, CassaStorm, CassaFire and Dragon of the Stars are all Amazon Bestsellers. The IWSG with its super-efficient team of dedicated writers has to its credit, writing contests, twitter pitch parties, it has brought out several anthologies. The IWSG website has amazing and informative posts from publishing experts.

The March 6 question - Whose perspective do you like to write from best, the hero (protagonist) or the villain (antagonist)? And why?

I have always written from the hero or the heroine’s perspective. I think this POV works the best for me. I like being inside the protagonist’s head and ultimately it is also about the battle of good versus evil, so I would like to send the message to my readers (I write kidlit: picture books, chapter books and middle grade books) that good triumphs over evil. Though I do want to write a book from the antagonist’s perspective. I have written a book where the hero has shades of grey, but he is not the out and out villain that an antagonist would be.

Eager to read about all your writing perspectives.


15 comments:

  1. I feel the same way. I want good to triumph over evil.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I feel the same way as you and Alex. Good luck with your goals!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Those are several big goals. Perhaps prioritize them and remind yourself it's okay if you don't meet all of your goals by April 1st. <3

    ReplyDelete
  4. I was going to say that I feel the same way too. I know there has to be conflict, but I do prefer the good guys to win - unless it's totally unbelievable, of course. But then we're the writers, so we can make sure that doesn't happen after all!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Since you write for children, showing them the hero is better. They need good examples, not bad ones. They get enough of that in the real world.

    ReplyDelete
  6. It is a definite challenge for me to write anything but the protag. :-)

    Anna from elements of emaginette

    ReplyDelete
  7. The hero is extremely important in kidlit, especially good defeating evil.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Good answer. And great reasoning behind it!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Very ambitious goals – but that doesn't mean you can't meet them!

    ReplyDelete
  10. It's a good idea to go with the flow, especially when attacked by inspiration and energy. I hope you reach all your goals, Rachna!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Good luck with your goals, Rachna. I'm with you (and many others) I want good to overcome evil. So I write from the Protag's pov.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Most of my stories have no true protagonist or antagonist; thus I get to write from a villain-type hero. Meaning, my bad guy is still a good guy in his own villainous world. A true protagonist is hard for me to write; but I don't really believe in absolute good or absolute evil. Well, not in humans, that is.

    ReplyDelete
  13. It's good to have goals:) I love multiple perspectives, but I've found many publishers are hesitant about them.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Wow! You've made loads!!! They're all beautiful! I hope Issy is better soon!
    clipping path

    ReplyDelete